Classification of subordinate nouns, adjectives and adjectival noun

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SUBSTANTIVE SUBORDINADAS

They are named because it amounts to an NP or, if not, a PrepP, given that a PrepP is only an NP which precedes a preposition.
Types of subordinate substantive: The type and function coincide, so there are as many types as syntactic functions can deliver. They can perform the functions of an NP or a PrepP, but not all: basically, the subject-CD-Attribute-CRV-CN-cadjan and CADV.
The IC and the CAG are proper noun adjective.
They can sometimes carry the role of CC, but in cases that match the classification of adverbial subordinate, say they are subordinate adverbial. Some non-adverbial and we could say that they are substantive, DC would be the instrument or company.
Nexos. The links introductory subordinate ground are:
1.1. That (? which, which, whom, which and never wears or conclusive front tilde) Conjunction.
1.2. If (used to introduce indirect questions total) Conjunction
1.3. Infinitive (if not verbal periphrasis) N / V
1.4. What (used to introduce indirect questions partial) determinant interrogative pronouns, depending on whether you're alone or accompanying a N.
1.5. What / is (used to introduce indirect questions partial) interrogative pronoun, is always single, unnamed, and does not factor in front, although it may take a PrepP behind. Example: Which one
1.6. Who / is (used to introduce indirect questions partial) interrogative pronoun, is always single, unnamed, and does not factor in front, but behind it may take a PrepP.
1.7. Long / a / os / as (indirect questions serves to introduce partial) determinant interrogative pronouns, depending on whether you're alone or accompanying a N. It may take a back SPREP
1.8. I (used to introduce indirect questions to ask about the partial mode) Interrogative Adverb
1.9. When (serves to introduce partial indirect questions ask about the weather) Interrogative Adverb
1.10. Where (serves to introduce partial indirect questions ask about the place) Interrogative Adverb

Functions of the links. If they are conjunctions or infinitives (types 1,2 and 3) the connection ever fails within the subordinate role of substance. In the event that ties are interrogative (types 4,5,6,7,8,9 and 10) always meet in the subordinate role.
If you are interrogative adverbs, the function is easy: How to always honor of CCModo, When, Where of CCTiempo and that of CCLugar.
More complex are the chances of the other links interrogative, thus determining if help build the SN, and if they are pronouns, depending on whether or not carried forward preposition can serve many roles: Subject, CD, CI, CRV, CAG, CN, cadjan, CADV or CC.
Background. The subordinate substantive background are never under any circumstances.

SUBORDINADAS adjective or ON

Adjectives are called because it amounts to a Sadja and Relative, because all links are relative, ie they mean something, have a reference point, as always mentioned before displaying the adjectival subordinate is called antecedent.
Adjectival subordinate functions. All subordinate adjectival or relative perform the same function, that of CN, so the role and type in this type of subordinate does not match.
Nexus:
2.1. Let (= who, which, which, whom, which). It can take decisive forward but not required. Do not use accents ever. Its status is relative pronoun.
2.2. What s Always forward and never tilde determinant. Its status is relative pronoun
2.3. Who / is never takes decisive front, which may be commuted, which, who, which and for which, which, whom, which. Its status is relative pronoun.
2.4. Cuyo / a / os / as never before has determinant. Its status is relative pronoun, though it is a very complex word as always with a name that agrees in gender and number, so it looks like a determinant, and replaces a phrase, with what looks like a pronoun. In some textbooks get possessive adjective category, as its meaning indicates ownership or possession.
2.5. As (= with whom, where, who, whom). Never use accents. Its status is relative adverb.
2.6. When (= where, which, whom, which) has never tilde. Its status is relative adverb.
2.7. Where (= in which, which, whom, which) has never tilde. Its status is relative adverb.

Link function in the adjectival subordinate. All links in the adjectival a role in the subordinate clause. The easiest are those of relative adverbs, because as always performs in CCModo, When and Where CCTiempo that of that of CCLugar, and is also always the same relative pronoun Whose, who does the CN.
The functions that can perform What, Who and What may be different depending on whether or not leading preposition, are: subject, CD, CI, Attribute, CRV, CC, CN, cadjan ...
Background of the link. All subordinate adjective always have a precedent to which they relate. The antecedent is the meaning of which is filled in each case the relative pronoun or adverb. It is a noun which is immediately in front, sometimes it's just a name, sometimes a more complex noun phrase, with its nucleus and its adjacent.
Should be noted that in the case of nexus "what" or "which" the antecedent is not a noun or noun phrase but a whole sentence.
Adjectival subordinate Types There are two types of adjectival subordinate, as adjective and CN in apposition. The two types are:
a) Explain.
The snake, moving to the rhythm of music, measuring three meters.

The relative pronoun refers to the entire history so it is assumed that there was only one snake and she met both of the above: measuring three meters and move to music.

In a written text explaining the adjectival subordinate who is intercalated in the main go between commas or at least before starting a comma if the sentence ends. In an oral text between the antecedent and the link will break.

b) only.
The snake that moved to the rhythm of the music was three meters.

The relative pronoun refers to a part of history so that it is assumed that there was more of a snake met only feature three meters measure the moving to the beat of the music, the other did not move at that pace and not had such a measure.

In a written text specifies that this adjectival subordinate intercalated in the main go without commas. In an oral text between the antecedent and the link will not make any pauses.


SUBORDINADAS substantivized adjective

In the same way that you can substantiate adjectives, adjectival subordinate can substantiate. This type of prayer has its own characteristics of the subordinates of the substantive and adjective. As the substantive, can fulfill the functions of an NP and has no history, as the adjective, its links are relative (in this case only relative pronouns) and these connections always have a role in the subordinate clause.
Types of subordinate adjectival noun: the type and function coincide, so there are as many types as syntactic functions can deliver. The noun adjectival subordinate clauses fulfill the functions of an NP, or SPREP, given that SPREP is only one NP that preceded a preposition. In the functions that we have seen as belonging to the subordinate substantive: Subject-CD-Attribute-CRV-CN-cadjan and CADV, we must add the IC and CAG.
Nexos. The links introductory subordinate adjectival noun are:
3.1. That (? which, which, whom, which) is not mandatory but should never tilde determinant carry forward. Relative pronoun
3.2. Who s There can be switched by which, which, whom, which but for that, that, those, which (not so, because this is neutral and who is a personal pronoun) . There has never before tilde or conclusive. Relative pronoun
3.3. The / a / os / as. It can be switched by which, which, which, whom, which but for her who, what, where, which. Tilde never wears but can take decisive front, in fact usually do, often leads "all".

Link function in the subordinate adjectival noun: the nexus of these sentences always have a role that, depending on whether they are or not, preposition can be diverse: Subject, CD, Attribute, CI, CRV, ... We must pay attention to the nexus The because although it appears to function as CCCantidad, often is a CD. Example: I will give everything I own.
Background: the subordinate adjectival noun antecedent are never under any circumstances.

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