Rima XI, LIII

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The rhyme XI belongs to the first series of Rhymes GA Becquer (1830-1870), romantic poet of the nineteenth century. The poem is a fictional dialogue between poetry and three women. The first stanza begins with a woman "brown", "hot" and passionate ( "symbol of passion") offered to the poet. The second stanza continues with the antithesis of its predecessor: the female "pale face" and "golden tresses. In the third stanza, it represents the ideal woman and love "impossible" ( "vain phantom of mist and light"). Of the three women he talks, the poet prefers the latter must. With his election Becquer enhances the basic theme of the rhyme and, by extension, of the series to which it belongs: women-love-poetry. Throughout the three stanzas are parallelism and anaphora referring to the three female characters ( "I am ..."). The treatment of the subject makes this one of the most representative of the first series.LIII rhyme is the theme that the author is unhappy love, and helping nature. The poem deals with a woman who apparently does not want the author has left out. He tells her everything will appear to again be the same as when they were together, but it will never be the same, and it may seem that a man turns to love as he loved her, but says that none of them want both. In my view, the poem is divided in three parts, which in turn could be separated into two. The first part would constitute the first two stanzas, which talks about how as the swallows return every year, just like when they were together (first verse and first subdivision), but also says that they will return not be the same as they were when they were together (second verse and second division). The second part would consist of stanzas three and four, who assert that the honeysuckle again climb the wall again (third verse and first subdivision), but these honeysuckles not be the same than when they were together, and nor shall be equal (fourth stanza

and second division). Finally, the third party would constitute the fifth and sixth stanzas, in this stanza the author tells the woman he might come back to feel the love of another man (fifth stanza and the first subdivision), but that no man can love her as He loved it (sixth stanza and second division). Following one of the characteristics of Romanticism, this poem does not use any of the classic stanzas. The Rime of the even lines is free, the verses two, six, ten, fourteen, eighteen and twenty-rhyme to rhyme together, and in turn the lines four, eight, twelve, sixteen, twenty and twenty-four, also with rhyme except the number twenty, which rhyme in assonance. Following one of the characteristics of Romanticism, this poem does not use any of the classic stanzas. The Rime of the even lines is free, the verses two, six, ten, fourteen, eighteen and twenty rhyming together with rhyme, And in turn the lines four, eight, twelve, sixteen, twenty and twenty-four, also in rhyme, except the number twenty, which rhyme in assonance. This is a Romantic poem. It seeks to break the rules that prevent the expression of self, and hence refuses to conform to the standards common metric, it seeks to express the feelings, the passions of the soul, dreams, imagination, and so on., So rejected Enlightenment rationalism. Pessimism and melancholy are the result of the clash between romantic ideals and reality, that do not match, the romantic value the authentic, genuine, traditional, and folk castizo his country, and this leads to nationalism. The themes in this period are cultivated nature, reflecting the mood of the poet, passionate love, which leads to a tragic, melancholy and unattainable love, sadness and pain that causes, freedom and social justice, and the flight of the surrounding world, which conveys the romantic and exotic past idealizes the plunge into a deep pessimism.

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